Explore the Road


Why the Hume Highway?

“The Driver” (Kyeamba Gap Truck Stop, 2016)

 

“You get familiar. You get attached. You’ll never be a local in the towns you know so well, from years of rest stops and coffee breaks, but they feel like part of your backyard nonetheless.”

The Hume is an important road, and has been since its first beginnings as a winding, rutted dirt track back in 1818, called the Great South Road in NSW and Sydney Road in Victoria. It’s been the Hume (Highway, Motorway or Freeway, depending where you are) since 1928.

It captures people’s imaginations, in the way that few travel routes do. It’s something about the distance, and the feeling of the road, but also in the way that as long as it is – 840km – it’s also a frequently travelled commuter route for some people. You get familiar. You get attached. You’ll never be a local in the towns you know so well, from years of rest stops and coffee breaks, but they feel like part of your backyard nonetheless.

And yet, familiar as the long road can be, if you’re lucky enough to know its quirks and its sameness and its quintessential Australian-ness, it still feels like a private journey of discovery every time you drive it. This is mine, I think, every time I start out, and every time with that feeling of excitement of going forth, exploring.

A child of a public service family, I’ve travelled the Hume between Melbourne and Canberra regularly for thirty years. If you’ve never had the opportunity to see our wide open country in the places between the cities – after all, flying is commonplace for the majority – then this exhibition will give you a taste of the space, the humour, the sights and the feeling of travelling The Road.


The Route

Yarra Glen in Victoria to Canberra ACT, here are the locations that correspond to the photographs included in The Road Exhibition.